Mikhail Gigolashvili

Mikhail Gigolashvili studied Russian Philology at Tbilisi University, and later in Leningrad, Russia, before obtaining his doctorate in 1984. In 1991 he published a study titled Dostoevsky Storytellers and a number of articles relating to foreign influences in Russian literature. In 1991 he moved to Saarbriicken, Germany, where he teaches Russian at the University of the Saarland.

Rossica 21

A New Chapter. Part 1
Russian Writing from the 21st Century

The first of a special double issue of ROSSICA published to mark the occasion of Russia’s Guest of Honour status at the London Book Fair, an unprecedented event which brought 50 leading Russian writers to Britain. These two Rossicas set out to capture the range and depth of the literary scene in Russia, with Part 1 featuring well-established authors such as Vladimir Makanin and Olga Slavnikova alongside promising newcomers such as Zakhar Prilepin.

Rossica 21

A New Chapter. Part 1
Russian Writing from the 21st Century

The first of a special double issue of ROSSICA published to mark the occasion of Russia’s Guest of Honour status at the London Book Fair, an unprecedented event which brought 50 leading Russian writers to Britain. These two Rossicas set out to capture the range and depth of the literary scene in Russia, with Part 1 featuring well-established authors such as Vladimir Makanin and Olga Slavnikova alongside promising newcomers such as Zakhar Prilepin.

Mikhail Gigolashvili

Mikhail Gigolashvili studied Russian Philology at Tbilisi University, and later in Leningrad, Russia, before obtaining his doctorate in 1984. In 1991 he published a study titled Dostoevsky Storytellers and a number of articles relating to foreign influences in Russian literature. In 1991 he moved to Saarbriicken, Germany, where he teaches Russian at the University of the Saarland.

Gigolashvili

Mikhail Gigolashvili studied Russian Philology at Tbilisi University, and later in Leningrad, Russia, before obtaining his doctorate in 1984. In 1991 he published a study titled Dostoevsky Storytellers and a number of articles relating to foreign influences in Russian literature. In 1991 he moved to Saarbriicken, Germany, where he teaches Russian at the University of the Saarland.
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