Rossica Young Translators Award

Shortlist Announced! Many thanks to everyone who entered the Rossica Young Translators Award this year, and to our judges for all their hard work in making the award possible. We are delighted to announce that the shortlist has now been decided! The winner will be announced on the 20th of March, alongside the Rossica Prize, as part of the SLOVO Russian Literature Festival – see here for more information! Running annually since 2009, the Rossica Young Translators Award aims to promote the art of literary translation from Russian into English. Alongside its older sibling, the Rossica Prize, which rewards the best of newly published translations of Russian literature, the Young Translators Award was set up to encourage the next generation of aspiring translators. Passionate and talented translators are essential for the future health of Russian literature and its impact on the English-speaking world, and the RYTA aims to reward the talent of young translators, while inspiring them with a taste of Russia's most exciting new literature. The award now has a global reach, and previous winners and shortlisted entrants have gone on to successful careers as professional translators and editors. Submissions are accepted from entrants up to the age of 24, and consist of a translation of a prose extract from works by Russia's foremost contemporary novelists. Entrants may choose between three extracts, each of around 2,500 words. The winning entry will be awarded a prize of £500. This year's jury includes Dr. Oliver Ready, Professor Donald Rayfield, and Dr. Jamie Rann. All judges work as professional translators and academics in the field of Russian literature. Their experience and expertise are essential to the success of the award, providing the necessary critical judgement for the selection of the winning submission, and also offers an exciting opportunity for young translators to come into contact with their role models. ROSSICA YOUNG TRANSLATORS AWARD 2014 – SHORTLIST Ian Fallon (University of St Andrews), Pepperstein Laura Thomas, (unaffiliated), Shargunov Walker Thompson, (Westminster School), Shargunov Katherine Wood, (unaffiliated), Sakhnovsky

7th Russian Film Festival Closing Night

London Lion Award Ceremony
Sunday 17 November 2013
The May Fair Theatre, Stratton St, London W1J 8LT

Rossica Prize

The judges of the Rossica Translation Prize for 2014 faced an embarrassment of riches. The long-list was exceptionally strong this year, and included many new and gifted translators who will be shaping the reception of Russian literature in English for years to come. No less promisingly, it also included a large number of important works translated into English for the first time. All the long-listed translators and publishers are to be congratulated on what can truthfully be called an urozhainyi god, or ‘year of plenty’.

Young Translators Award 2012

Rossica Young Translators Award was established in 2009 to support young people who are passionate about the world of translation and to encourage literary translation amongst those who study and speak Russian. With the help of this award we would like to nurture a new generation of Russian to English translators, as well as encourage cultural dialogue. What is more, this award casts a spotlight on the newest developments in Russian literature by selecting extracts for translation from the latest releases by acclaimed contemporary authors.

Winners of the Rossica Translation Prize and the Rossica Young Translation Award announced

Many congratulations to John Elsworth, who has won the Rossica Translation Award 2012 for his translation of Petersburg by Andrei Bely. The winner of the Rossica Young Translators Award is Gregory Afinogenov for his translation of an extract from S.N.U.F.F by Victor Pelevin.

RYTA submissions close

Academia Rossica is delighted to announce that we have received 183 entries for the 2012 Rossica Young Translators Award.This is an unprecedented number of submissions and we are especially pleased to have received translations from all over the world, including Europe, Russia and North America.

Rossica 18

The Ties of Blood
Russian Literature from the 21st Century

This edition of Rossica takes on a new form! It is an Anthology of New Russian Writing, featuring both prose and poetry translated into English and edited by leading specialists.
The issue was launched at the first Russian Literature Week, in April 2008.

Winner of 2011 Russian Young Translators Award Announced

Maya Vinokour of the University of Pennsylvania has won the Rossica Young Translators Prize 2011. The result was announced at a special event at the London Book Fair in the Pen Literary Cafes by Rossica Young Translator judge and esteemed translator Andrew Bromfield.

Young Translators Award 2013

Rossica Young Translators Award was established in 2009 to support young people who are passionate about the world of translation and to encourage literary translation amongst those who study and speak Russian. With the help of this award we would like to nurture a new generation of Russian to English translators, as well as encourage cultural dialogue. What is more, this award casts a spotlight on the newest developments in Russian literature by selecting extracts for translation from the latest releases by acclaimed contemporary authors.

Sharov

A historian of medieval Russia by training, Vladimir Sharov (b. 1952) is the son of a geneticist who turned to writing prose, for children and adults, in the 1960s. Sharov himself began writing fiction in the late 1970s, but it was not until the 1990s that his highly unusual historiosophical novels came before the public gaze.

Call for submissions for the ROSSICA TRANSLATION PRIZE 2011

AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN RUSSIAN TO ENGLISH LITERARY TRANSLATION We are delighted to announce that entries for the Rossica Translation Prize 2011 are now open. The Rossica Prize is the only prize awarded for the best new translation of a high-quality Russian literary work into English. Literary work must be written in Russian by any author, present or past, and published in English in 2009 and 2010. The prize is open to works published in any country. The value of the prize is £5,000 divided between the winning translator and the publisher.

Winner of the Rossica Young Translator's Award 2010 announced! See here for video footage.

Winner of the Rossica Young Translators Award 2010 announced! On 21 April the winner of the RYTA was announced by judges Oliver Ready and Robert Chandler at a special ceremony in the PEN Literary Café at the London Book Fair. The winner is: Leo Shtutin for his translation of an extract from Mikhail Shishkin's novel Letter-Book (Письмовник) Leo Shtutin receives £500 and an invitation from Academia Rossica to travel to Moscow to take part in a Translators' Congress in September 2010. The Congress will be a high-profile event which will take place during the International Moscow Book Fair and in which more 100 translators of Russian literature will take part.

Vladimir Sharov

A historian of medieval Russia by training, Vladimir Sharov (b. 1952) is the son of a geneticist who turned to writing prose, for children and adults, in the 1960s. Sharov himself began writing fiction in the late 1970s, but it was not until the 1990s that his highly unusual historiosophical novels came before the public gaze. In so doing, they caused genuine acrimony and controversy among influential editors of the literary journals (especially Novyi mir).

Sharov

A historian of medieval Russia by training, Vladimir Sharov (b. 1952) is the son of a geneticist who turned to writing prose, for children and adults, in the 1960s. Sharov himself began writing fiction in the late 1970s, but it was not until the 1990s that his highly unusual historiosophical novels came before the public gaze.

Robert Porter

When Academia Rossica approached me to serve on the jury for their translation prize, I was excited and intrigued. What would the field be like, how many entries would there be, were there still publishers around in the West willing to produce translations of serious Russian works? The classics apart, was there more to Russian literature for English-speaking people than penguins and historical detectives? My caricature of the average Western reader's view of Russian literature today can perhaps be excused in part by my own education.

Martin Dewhirst

I was delighted and astonished when I received the invitation to be one of the judges of this year’s ‘Rossica’ Translation Prize. Delighted – because, by accepting, I would be able to indulge myself with a clear conscience in reading (or, as it often turned out, rereading) many works of Russian literature rather than doing what I all too often do – reading works about Russian literature (and various other things). Astonished – because I am not a prolific or high-profile translator of Russian literature, so I was unsure about why I had been chosen. However, not being known for false modesty, I did feel that I was reasonably well qualified for the work ahead.

Anthony Briggs

Izbavi Bog i nas ot etakikh sudei

A few weeks ago something strange happened. Someone sent me, through the post, ten million printed words – I’ll repeat that, in case you weren’t concentrating: ten million words – nearly half of them in a difficult foreign language. I was told to get reading them.

Rossica 18

The Ties of Blood
Russian Literature from the 21st Century

This edition of Rossica takes on a new form! It is an Anthology of New Russian Writing, featuring both prose and poetry translated into English and edited by leading specialists.
The issue was launched at the first Russian Literature Week, in April 2008.
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