Press

PRESS RELEASE 5th SLOVO RUSSIAN LITERATURE FESTIVAL OPENS IN LONDON ON 8 MARCH 2014 www.academia-rossica.org From Pushkin to Pelevin, Dostoevsky to Shishkin, Tolstoy to Bykov - literature has always been Russia’s calling card. And writers have been its most important ambassadors! Their stories, their insights into human nature, their philosophical musings and debates continue to engage and inspire readers all over the world. And when speaking about the relationship between Britain and Russia, it is certainly the literary links that have been the strongest ties between the two countries. It is therefore no surprise then that the only festival of Russian literature outside Russia was established in London! This year, the SLOVO Russian Literature Festival is returning to London for the 5th time! Russia's most celebrated writers will be in attendance, presenting their new books, meeting with readers, debating with UK authors and specialists, and discussing new projects with publishers and translators. SLOVO – a chance for Russian writers to bring their work to the UK and an opportunity for UK audiences to meet with the key players in Russian intellectual life. This year's SLOVO will run from the 8-23 March, featuring 16 Russian authors at 20 events over the course for 16 days at 6 prestigious and celebrated venues around London. IN SEARCH OF LOST REALITY  In Search of Lost Reality. The theme of this year's Festival is open to interpretation; our writers will talk not only about their works but about how they capture today's rapidly changing reality and the transience of our experiences and emotions. The Festival opens on 8 March with a talk by Mikhail Shishkin – Of Living Noses and Dead Souls. One of the most celebrated contemporary Russian writers will reflect on the great and eternal themes which are still relevant in today's Russia. He will be followed by “Night Snipers” rock musician Diana Arbenina, who will present Sprinter – a new collection of poems published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of her performances. Famous and internationally award-winning writers, Zakhar Prilepin, Alexander Terekhov, Sergei Shargunov, and Olga Sedakova will be joining us for this year's SLOVO Festival which will also feature exclusive films based on the works Ilf and Petrov, Pelevin, and Bulgakov. ROSSICA TRANSLATION PRIZE March 20 sees the long-awaited announcement of the prestigious Rossica Prize. Established in 2005, it is the world's only prize for the translation of Russian literature into English. The prize is awarded by Academia Rossica with the support of the Russky Mir foundation. The Rossica Young Translators' Award – an annual competition for young translators – will also be announced. The Awards Ceremony will be preceded by a talk from Rossica Prize judge and translator, Oliver Ready – Cat and Mouse with Dostoevsky. The Translator as Detective. He will discuss the challenges of translation, especially in his recent work with Crime and Punishment and the ambiguous, flowing nature of the conversations between the Investigator, Porfiry Petrovich, and his suspect, Rodion Raskolnikov. TALES OF RUSSIAN LONDON Russian Londoners! Grab your pens! For the first time in SLOVO history, we will be holding a competition! Russian Londoners are invited to write on the theme of The Moment I Loved/Hated/Knew London. Organised by Academia Rossica and www.RusskyLondon.com, the best stories will be published as a collection – Tales of Russian London. __________________________ The full programme of the SLOVO Festival can be found at: www.academia-rossica.org The SLOVO Festival will be in London between 8 and 23 March 2014 as part of the 2014 UK-Russia Year of Culture, with the support of the Russky Mir Foundation. Organiser: ACADEMIA ROSSICA is an independent arts organisation set up in London in 2000 to promote cultural and intellectual ties between Russia and Britain.We represent Russian artists, filmmakers, writers and publishers. Academia Rossica projects are supported by the Russian Embassy, the Russian Ministry of Culture and our corporate partners. http://academia-rossica.org SLOVO Festival Partners: Waterstones Piccadilly, The London Library, King's Russia Institute, MacDougall's Arts, Erarta Galleries, The May Fair Hotel, www.RusskyLondon.com. Media Partners: Russia Beyond the Headlines, Angliya, Kommersant UK, British Style, Russian Mind, Voice of Russia __________________________ CONTACTS For enquiries regarding press accreditation, interviews and photo requests, please contact Academia Rossica: press@academia-rossica.org Academia Rossica
 76 Brewer Street, Piccadilly Circus, London W1F 9TX

 Tel: +44 20 7287 2614, +44 20 7287 5712

Guests

Roman Liberov is a documentary filmmaker and animator. He trained at the BBC specializing in documentary filmmaking, where he then worked for six years. Ilfandpetrov forms part of a cycle of animated documentaries about Russian writers, including Yuri Olesha, Joseph Brodsky, Georgi Vladimov, and Sergei Dovlatov.

Mikhail Shishkin announced as finalist for 2013 Best Translated Book Award

The finalists for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award have been announced, and we are excited to see that the list includes SLOVO guest Mikhail Shishkin’s brilliant novel Maidenhair, translated by Marian Schwartz! Congratulations!

Mikhail Shishkin

Mikhail Shishkin is widely considered one of the greatest Russian writers today, and his unique style has led to comparisons with writers of revered classics.

Many congratulations to Vladimir Sorokin!

Today it was announced that he is a finalist in of one of the most prestigious literary prizes in the world - the Man Booker International Prize!

Andrei Bitov

Andrei Bitov is one of the most important Russian writers of the last fifty years, justly famous for his groundbreaking post-modern novel Pushkin House. Born in Leningrad in 1937, Bitov spent the war in evacuation in the Urals and Uzbekistan. After returning to his native city in 1944, Bitov became a geologist, travelling all over the Soviet Union. He started writing short stories in 1959, but did not become a full-time writer until he moved to Moscow in 1963.

Sergei Lukyanenko

Sergei Lukyanenko is one of the foremost Russian writers and one of the few to be acclaimed outside of Russia. After originally studying as a psychiatrist, Lukyanenko chose instead to become a prolific science-fiction writer. He is best known, particularly abroad, for his incredibly popular series of Watches, starting with Night Watch (1998) and ending with Final Watch (2006). The series chronicles the supernatural conflict between two organisations, the Night Watch and Day Watch, who strive to uphold the truce between good and evil.

Ludmila Ulitskaya

Ludmila Ulitskaya was born in 1943 in the Urals and graduated from Moscow University with a Degree of Master in Biology. She worked in the Institute of Genetics as a scientist. Shortly before Perestroika she became Repertory Director of the Hebrew Theatre of Moscow and began writing scripts. Ulitskaya can be defined as one of the most far-reaching contemporary Russian writers with over two million books sold worldwide.

Robert Porter

Robert Porter taught Russian Language and Literature at the University of Bristol for 25 years, eventually being promoted to a Personal Chair there. From 1999 until 2005 he was Professor of Slavonic Studies at the University of Glasgow. His monographs on Russian Literature include Four Contemporary Russian Writers (1989) and Russia's Alternative Prose (1994).

Martin Dewhirst

Martin Dewhirst has lectured on Russian language and literature at the University of Glasgow since 1964. He is particularly interested in twentieth century Russian literature and has compiled many bibliographies on the subject for The Year's Work in Modern Language Studies. He has worked periodically on the Samizdat staff of Radio Liberty in Munich and is also a specialist on Soviet censorship and archives.

Rossica 21

A New Chapter. Part 1
Russian Writing from the 21st Century

The first of a special double issue of ROSSICA published to mark the occasion of Russia’s Guest of Honour status at the London Book Fair, an unprecedented event which brought 50 leading Russian writers to Britain. These two Rossicas set out to capture the range and depth of the literary scene in Russia, with Part 1 featuring well-established authors such as Vladimir Makanin and Olga Slavnikova alongside promising newcomers such as Zakhar Prilepin.

Press release - Russia: Global Market Forum, BEA 2012

Russia is to be the Guest of Honour at BookExpo America’s Global Market Forum in 2012 in New York. Sponsored by the country’s Federal Agency for Press and Mass Communications, and supported by Academia Rossica and Intelligent Television, a particularly broad set of events for both publishing professionals as well as a general cultural audience is currently being planned. The primary goals are to shed light on Russian publishing and contemporary literature in one of the world’s most diverse, yet least known book landscapes. “We are particularly enthusiastic to roll out the carpet for Russia with its long and prestigious literary tradition as well as help the match making between Russian and American book professionals”, says BEA’s event director Steven Rosato.

Russia to be guest of honour at the BookExpo America Global Market Forum 2012

Massive literary and professional programme, with 50 Russian writers and as many editors in preparation…

Rossica 21

A New Chapter. Part 1
Russian Writing from the 21st Century

The first of a special double issue of ROSSICA published to mark the occasion of Russia’s Guest of Honour status at the London Book Fair, an unprecedented event which brought 50 leading Russian writers to Britain. These two Rossicas set out to capture the range and depth of the literary scene in Russia, with Part 1 featuring well-established authors such as Vladimir Makanin and Olga Slavnikova alongside promising newcomers such as Zakhar Prilepin.

Russia's cosmonauts of dystopia

by Claire Armistead
The spirit of Yuri Gagarin will launch a new breed of Russian writers in London next week.
One of the more surreal moments in the literary history of planet Earth will occur on Tuesday when Russian cosmonauts in orbit in the International Space Station will answer questions from visitors to the London Book Fair in Earls Court.

The Russians are coming to the 2011 London Book Fair!

Leading Russian writers billed for the London Book Fair 2011. The London Book Fair with their strategic partner, the British Council, and The Russian Federal Agency for Press and Mass Communication with their official partner Academia Rossica announce the Russia Market Focus Cultural Programme

SLOVO festival 2010

SLOVO Russian Literature Festival 19 - 25 April 2010 London and other UK cities Russian Literature Week is back for the third time, held in the same week as the London Book Fair. The aim is to highlight Russian writers and publishers, both in London and on an international scale. This year's SLOVO will also showcase the new generation of writers, exciting new poets and the fascinating culture scene of today's Russia.

Ludmila Ulitskaya

Ludmila Ulitskaya was born in 1943 in the Urals and graduated from Moscow University with a Degree of Master in Biology. She worked in the Institute of Genetics as a scientist. Shortly before Perestroika she became Repertory Director of the Hebrew Theatre of Moscow and began writing scripts. Ulitskaya can be defined as one of the most far-reaching contemporary Russian writers with over two million books sold worldwide.

Sergei Lukyanenko

Sergei Lukyanenko is one of the foremost Russian writers and one of the few to be acclaimed outside of Russia. After originally studying as a psychiatrist, Lukyanenko chose instead to become a prolific science-fiction writer. He is best known, particularly abroad, for his incredibly popular series of Watches, starting with Night Watch (1998) and ending with Final Watch (2006). The series chronicles the supernatural conflict between two organisations, the Night Watch and Day Watch, who strive to uphold the truce between good and evil.

Andrei Bitov

Andrei Bitov is one of the most important Russian writers of the last fifty years, justly famous for his groundbreaking post-modern novel Pushkin House. Born in Leningrad in 1937, Bitov spent the war in evacuation in the Urals and Uzbekistan. After returning to his native city in 1944, Bitov became a geologist, travelling all over the Soviet Union. He started writing short stories in 1959, but did not become a full-time writer until he moved to Moscow in 1963.

Galina

Maria Galina is one of the most interesting authors among those who made their names in the turbulent 1990s. She writes both literary and science fiction (with ten SF books to her credit). She is also a noted poet, a thoughtful critic, and translator of English and American science fiction, in all of which she excels. She is a winner of many important prizes for her prose and poetry and her critical essays.

Ulitskaya

Ludmila Ulitskaya was born in 1943 in the Urals and graduated from Moscow University with a Degree of Master in Biology. She worked in the Institute of Genetics as a scientist. Shortly before Perestroika she became Repertory Director of the Hebrew Theatre of Moscow and began writing scripts. Ulitskaya can be defined as one of the most far-reaching contemporary Russian writers with over two million books sold worldwide.

Lukyanenko

Sergei Lukyanenko is one of the foremost Russian writers and one of the few to be acclaimed outside of Russia. After originally studying as a psychiatrist, Lukyanenko chose instead to become a prolific science-fiction writer. He is best known, particularly abroad, for his incredibly popular series of Watches, starting with Night Watch (1998) and ending with Final Watch (2006). The series chronicles the supernatural conflict between two organisations, the Night Watch and Day Watch, who strive to uphold the truce between good and evil.

Bitov

Andrei Bitov is one of the most important Russian writers of the last fifty years, justly famous for his groundbreaking post-modern novel Pushkin House. Born in Leningrad in 1937, Bitov spent the war in evacuation in the Urals and Uzbekistan. After returning to his native city in 1944, Bitov became a geologist, travelling all over the Soviet Union. He started writing short stories in 1959, but did not become a full-time writer until he moved to Moscow in 1963.

XXIII Moscow International Book Fair International Lounge events programme

The International Lounge at the Moscow International Book Fair is a space where the Russian publishing world can form links with the international book industry. Alongside the extensive programme of seminars and roundtables, it is a place for networking and deals, as well as being an information centre on international collaboration. The International Lounge is organised by Academia Rossica with the support from the Federal Agency for Press and Mass Communication and the Moscow International Book Fair. The programme of seminars and presentations is focused on the preparation for Russia Market Focus at the London Book Fair 2011.

Press Release

On 19 – 25 April ACADEMIA ROSSICA will bring you SLOVO, the Russian Literature Festival that knows no boundaries. Packed with a kaleidoscope of genre-defying events, SLOVO will offer a unique insight into Russian literary culture, presenting not only the foremost contemporary Russian writers and highly opinionated public figures, such as Dmitry Bykov, Sergei Lukyanenko, Olga Slavnikova, Maria Galina and Vladimir Sharov, but also cutting edge young writers and poets from right across Russia’s eleven time zones. This year’s festival sees a particular focus on fantasy and magical realism. Lukyanenko’s 'Night Watch' series clearly comes under this genre, but ‘Living Souls’ by Dmitry Bykov,‘2017’ by Olga Slavnikova and ‘Iramifications’ by Maria Galina, all newly published in English, have also been influenced by this notable undercurrent of Russian writing. Our authors will present their new books in light of this genre, which has its roots in the 19th and 20th century literary greats, Gogol, Bulgakov, Zamyatin and Platonov, while Lev Danilkin, literary critic and ‘Afisha’ columnist will explore why Russian literature has a tendency to look at reality through a prism of the unreal. In addition to events with established authors, SLOVO will introduce Russia’s newest literary voices. Olga Slavnikova, herself an award-winning writer, is the coordinator of Russia’s prestigious Debut prize for young writers and will present six Debut prize winners at this year’s festival, including three of Russian literature’s rising stars, Polina Klyukina from Perm, Alisa Ganieva from Dagestan and Alexander Gritsenko from Astrakhan. Key to this festival is the belief that literature can act as an instrument of social and political change and can help to bring two cultures together. For this reason SLOVO will coincide with the London Book Fair, where ties between the Russian and British publishing industry have already been strengthened by naming Russia Guest of Honour and Market Focus of the London Book Fair 2011. SLOVO will continue in this spirit with unique collaborative events between Russian and British poets, as well as providing numerous opportunities for cross-cultural discussions. Indeed, as the slogan ‘WORDS IN ACTION’ may suggest, SLOVO is not just about the written word. Film also plays an important part in this year’s festival. SLOVO will hold the first ever screening of Russian underground video poetry in the UK and the London premiere of Aliona Van der Horst’s hauntingly beautiful film on poet Boris Ryzhy. SLOVO’s broad spectrum of events will be held across several venues, Waterstones Piccadilly, Waterstones Hampstead, The Calvert 22 Gallery and the Apollo cinema. Come and join us for this un-missable chance to witness literature in transition!

DEBUT PRIZE

The Debut Prize was instituted in 2000 by State Duma Deputy Andrei Skoch, creator of the humanitarian foundation Pokolenie (Generation). Skoch originally conceived of Pokolenie as a medical charity to help provincial Russian clinics, sick children and pensioners. The Debut, Pokolenie’s only cultural project to date, has become a prize of national renown. The Debut has a strict age limit: entrants may not be over the age of 25. Members of the Russian literary establishment were skeptical at first. They doubted that writers so young would have something to say to readers. Young writers might try their hand at poetry, they argued, but they didn’t have enough life experience to write a story or a novel. However, the Debut has shown that a person’s life experience at any age is complete in and of itself. What a person knows about the world at 20 has been forgotten by the time he is 30. What he could have written at 20 he will no longer write at 30. He will write something else. Strangely enough, most writers live without their first book: it remains in their minds, in drafts. The Debut inspires young Russian writers to complete that first book. The Debut prompts them to commit to literature their unique experience, what might be described as the shock of their first encounter with grown-up life. Not just their new existential status, but daily events. Suddenly a person is faced with bank applications, having to pay rent and buy insurance; no one will fill out the forms for him, no one will answer for him. And he suddenly feels horribly alone in the world. This sort of loneliness, like any other, has a huge creative potential. The Debut brings in the first literary harvest of the writing generation — and it does so every year. 2010 marks the first year of Debut’s international program. Funded by Pokolenie, the program aims to present the works of Debut finalists and winners to the foreign reader. Collections of these works will be translated and their authors will be sent to international book fairs and festivals. This year’s collection appears in English and Chinese. Future collections will be brought out in French, German, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, and so on. Since the number of Debut finalists and winners is only increasing, as is their level and mastery, publication of their works in English will continue.

Maria Galina

Maria Galina is one of the most interesting authors among those who made their names in the turbulent 1990s. She writes both literary and science fiction (with ten SF books to her credit). She is also a noted poet, a thoughtful critic, and translator of English and American science fiction, in all of which she excels. She is a winner of many important prizes for her prose and poetry and her critical essays.

Galina

Maria Galina is one of the most interesting authors among those who made their names in the turbulent 1990s. She writes both literary and science fiction (with ten SF books to her credit). She is also a noted poet, a thoughtful critic, and translator of English and American science fiction, in all of which she excels. She is a winner of many important prizes for her prose and poetry and her critical essays.

SLOVO Russian Literature Festival

On 19 – 25 April ACADEMIA ROSSICA will bring you SLOVO, the Russian Literature Festival that knows no boundaries. Packed with a kaleidoscope of genre-defying events, SLOVO will offer a unique insight into Russian literary culture, presenting not only the foremost contemporary Russian writers and highly opinionated public figures, such as Dmitry Bykov, Sergei Lukyanenko, Olga Slavnikova, Maria Galina and Vladimir Sharov, but also cutting edge young writers and poets from right across Russia’s eleven time zones.

SLOVO 2012

SLOVO Russian Literature Festival 19 - 25 April 2010 London and other UK cities Russian Literature Week is back for the third time, held in the same week as the London Book Fair. The aim is to highlight Russian writers and publishers, both in London and on an international scale. This year's SLOVO will also showcase the new generation of writers, exciting new poets and the fascinating culture scene of today's Russia.

Day 1

The first day ended with an evening with Dmitry Bykov and Bridget Kendall at Waterstone’s, Piccadilly. Bykov entertained the large audience with, along with everything else, a joke. It went like this: “At birth you get a label put on your arm, after death, it’s put on your foot. If someone gets the same number both times, they win a prize – a pressure cooker.”
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