Press

PRESS RELEASE 5th SLOVO RUSSIAN LITERATURE FESTIVAL OPENS IN LONDON ON 8 MARCH 2014 www.academia-rossica.org From Pushkin to Pelevin, Dostoevsky to Shishkin, Tolstoy to Bykov - literature has always been Russia’s calling card. And writers have been its most important ambassadors! Their stories, their insights into human nature, their philosophical musings and debates continue to engage and inspire readers all over the world. And when speaking about the relationship between Britain and Russia, it is certainly the literary links that have been the strongest ties between the two countries. It is therefore no surprise then that the only festival of Russian literature outside Russia was established in London! This year, the SLOVO Russian Literature Festival is returning to London for the 5th time! Russia's most celebrated writers will be in attendance, presenting their new books, meeting with readers, debating with UK authors and specialists, and discussing new projects with publishers and translators. SLOVO – a chance for Russian writers to bring their work to the UK and an opportunity for UK audiences to meet with the key players in Russian intellectual life. This year's SLOVO will run from the 8-23 March, featuring 16 Russian authors at 20 events over the course for 16 days at 6 prestigious and celebrated venues around London. IN SEARCH OF LOST REALITY  In Search of Lost Reality. The theme of this year's Festival is open to interpretation; our writers will talk not only about their works but about how they capture today's rapidly changing reality and the transience of our experiences and emotions. The Festival opens on 8 March with a talk by Mikhail Shishkin – Of Living Noses and Dead Souls. One of the most celebrated contemporary Russian writers will reflect on the great and eternal themes which are still relevant in today's Russia. He will be followed by “Night Snipers” rock musician Diana Arbenina, who will present Sprinter – a new collection of poems published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of her performances. Famous and internationally award-winning writers, Zakhar Prilepin, Alexander Terekhov, Sergei Shargunov, and Olga Sedakova will be joining us for this year's SLOVO Festival which will also feature exclusive films based on the works Ilf and Petrov, Pelevin, and Bulgakov. ROSSICA TRANSLATION PRIZE March 20 sees the long-awaited announcement of the prestigious Rossica Prize. Established in 2005, it is the world's only prize for the translation of Russian literature into English. The prize is awarded by Academia Rossica with the support of the Russky Mir foundation. The Rossica Young Translators' Award – an annual competition for young translators – will also be announced. The Awards Ceremony will be preceded by a talk from Rossica Prize judge and translator, Oliver Ready – Cat and Mouse with Dostoevsky. The Translator as Detective. He will discuss the challenges of translation, especially in his recent work with Crime and Punishment and the ambiguous, flowing nature of the conversations between the Investigator, Porfiry Petrovich, and his suspect, Rodion Raskolnikov. TALES OF RUSSIAN LONDON Russian Londoners! Grab your pens! For the first time in SLOVO history, we will be holding a competition! Russian Londoners are invited to write on the theme of The Moment I Loved/Hated/Knew London. Organised by Academia Rossica and www.RusskyLondon.com, the best stories will be published as a collection – Tales of Russian London. __________________________ The full programme of the SLOVO Festival can be found at: www.academia-rossica.org The SLOVO Festival will be in London between 8 and 23 March 2014 as part of the 2014 UK-Russia Year of Culture, with the support of the Russky Mir Foundation. Organiser: ACADEMIA ROSSICA is an independent arts organisation set up in London in 2000 to promote cultural and intellectual ties between Russia and Britain.We represent Russian artists, filmmakers, writers and publishers. Academia Rossica projects are supported by the Russian Embassy, the Russian Ministry of Culture and our corporate partners. http://academia-rossica.org SLOVO Festival Partners: Waterstones Piccadilly, The London Library, King's Russia Institute, MacDougall's Arts, Erarta Galleries, The May Fair Hotel, www.RusskyLondon.com. Media Partners: Russia Beyond the Headlines, Angliya, Kommersant UK, British Style, Russian Mind, Voice of Russia __________________________ CONTACTS For enquiries regarding press accreditation, interviews and photo requests, please contact Academia Rossica: press@academia-rossica.org Academia Rossica
 76 Brewer Street, Piccadilly Circus, London W1F 9TX

 Tel: +44 20 7287 2614, +44 20 7287 5712

Guests

Roman Liberov is a documentary filmmaker and animator. He trained at the BBC specializing in documentary filmmaking, where he then worked for six years. Ilfandpetrov forms part of a cycle of animated documentaries about Russian writers, including Yuri Olesha, Joseph Brodsky, Georgi Vladimov, and Sergei Dovlatov.

Rossica Young Translators Award

Shortlist Announced! Many thanks to everyone who entered the Rossica Young Translators Award this year, and to our judges for all their hard work in making the award possible. We are delighted to announce that the shortlist has now been decided! The winner will be announced on the 20th of March, alongside the Rossica Prize, as part of the SLOVO Russian Literature Festival – see here for more information! Running annually since 2009, the Rossica Young Translators Award aims to promote the art of literary translation from Russian into English. Alongside its older sibling, the Rossica Prize, which rewards the best of newly published translations of Russian literature, the Young Translators Award was set up to encourage the next generation of aspiring translators. Passionate and talented translators are essential for the future health of Russian literature and its impact on the English-speaking world, and the RYTA aims to reward the talent of young translators, while inspiring them with a taste of Russia's most exciting new literature. The award now has a global reach, and previous winners and shortlisted entrants have gone on to successful careers as professional translators and editors. Submissions are accepted from entrants up to the age of 24, and consist of a translation of a prose extract from works by Russia's foremost contemporary novelists. Entrants may choose between three extracts, each of around 2,500 words. The winning entry will be awarded a prize of £500. This year's jury includes Dr. Oliver Ready, Professor Donald Rayfield, and Dr. Jamie Rann. All judges work as professional translators and academics in the field of Russian literature. Their experience and expertise are essential to the success of the award, providing the necessary critical judgement for the selection of the winning submission, and also offers an exciting opportunity for young translators to come into contact with their role models. ROSSICA YOUNG TRANSLATORS AWARD 2014 – SHORTLIST Ian Fallon (University of St Andrews), Pepperstein Laura Thomas, (unaffiliated), Shargunov Walker Thompson, (Westminster School), Shargunov Katherine Wood, (unaffiliated), Sakhnovsky

Rossica Prize

The judges of the Rossica Translation Prize for 2014 faced an embarrassment of riches. The long-list was exceptionally strong this year, and included many new and gifted translators who will be shaping the reception of Russian literature in English for years to come. No less promisingly, it also included a large number of important works translated into English for the first time. All the long-listed translators and publishers are to be congratulated on what can truthfully be called an urozhainyi god, or ‘year of plenty’.

Mark Krotov

Mark Krotov is an assistant editor at Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He was born in Moscow and moved to the United States in 1991. His translation of an essay by Kirill Medvedev will appear in It’s No Good, a forthcoming collection of Medvedev’s writings published by Ugly Duckling Presse.

Anne Fisher

Anne O. Fisher is the translator of two novels by the Soviet satirical duo Ilya Ilf and Evgeny Petrov, The Twelve Chairs and The Little Golden Calf (Russian Life Books, 2009). In 2007 she was short-listed for the Rossica translation prize for Ilf and Petrov’s American Road Trip: The 1935 Travelogue of Two Soviet Writers. She holds a PhD in Russian Literature from the University of Michigan and lives in San Francisco.

Young Translators Award 2012

Rossica Young Translators Award was established in 2009 to support young people who are passionate about the world of translation and to encourage literary translation amongst those who study and speak Russian. With the help of this award we would like to nurture a new generation of Russian to English translators, as well as encourage cultural dialogue. What is more, this award casts a spotlight on the newest developments in Russian literature by selecting extracts for translation from the latest releases by acclaimed contemporary authors.

Partners

Founded in 1841, The London Library is the UK's leading literary institution. With more than one million books and periodicals in over 50 languages, the collection includes works from the 16th century to the latest publications in print and electronic form.

The Joseph Brodsky/Stephen Spender Prize 2012

For the translation of Russian poetry into English
Judged by Sasha Dugdale, Catriona Kelly and Glyn Maxwell

Winners of the Rossica Translation Prize and the Rossica Young Translation Award announced

Many congratulations to John Elsworth, who has won the Rossica Translation Award 2012 for his translation of Petersburg by Andrei Bely. The winner of the Rossica Young Translators Award is Gregory Afinogenov for his translation of an extract from S.N.U.F.F by Victor Pelevin.

Rossica Translation Prize and RYTA shortlists announced

Academia Rossica is pleased to announce the shortlists for both the Rossica Translation Prize and the Rossica Young Translators Award.

RYTA submissions close

Academia Rossica is delighted to announce that we have received 183 entries for the 2012 Rossica Young Translators Award.This is an unprecedented number of submissions and we are especially pleased to have received translations from all over the world, including Europe, Russia and North America.

The Golden Calf

By Ilya Ilf and Evgeny Petrov
Translated by Konstantin Gurevich and Helen Anderson
Open Letter; 2009; pp. 336
ISBN 978-1934824078
The Golden Calf—the first complete translation of the novel—restores the absurd, manic energy of the original and reaffirms the judgment of the Soviet censors, who said: "You have a very nice hero, Ostap Bender. But really, he's just a son of a bitch." Ostap Bender, the "grand strategist," is obsessed with getting one last big score—a few hundred thousand will do—and heading for Rio de Janeiro, where there are "a million and a half people, all of them wearing white pants, without exception."

The Bronze Horseman

By Alexander Pushkin
Translated by Alistair Noon
Longbarrow Press; 2009; pp. 20
ISBN 978-1-906175-12-2
"If the translation is a success it won't need an apology but i'll offer one here for any dissatisfied customers. Pushkin is an all-rounder, so I tried to make my compromises everywhere a little bit, rather than prioritise one particular aspect and make a huge compromise elsewhere." Alistair Noon

The Bronze Horseman

By Alexander Pushkin
Translated by Alistair Noon
Longbarrow Press; 2009; pp. 20
ISBN 978-1-906175-12-2
"If the translation is a success it won't need an apology but i'll offer one here for any dissatisfied customers. Pushkin is an all-rounder, so I tried to make my compromises everywhere a little bit, rather than prioritise one particular aspect and make a huge compromise elsewhere." Alistair Noon

The Golden Calf

By Ilya Ilf and Evgeny Petrov
Translated by Konstantin Gurevich and Helen Anderson
Open Letter; 2009; pp. 336
ISBN 978-1934824078
The Golden Calf—the first complete translation of the novel—restores the absurd, manic energy of the original and reaffirms the judgment of the Soviet censors, who said: "You have a very nice hero, Ostap Bender. But really, he's just a son of a bitch." Ostap Bender, the "grand strategist," is obsessed with getting one last big score—a few hundred thousand will do—and heading for Rio de Janeiro, where there are "a million and a half people, all of them wearing white pants, without exception."

Sergei Ivanov

Sergei Ivanov is not only one of Russia’s most distinguished historians of Byzantium, but also a leading popular historian and columnist. Since receiving his PhD from Moscow State University in 1984, he has produced over 170 scholarly publications, including Holy Fools in Byzantium and Beyond, which was published in English translation by the Oxford University Press in 2006, and Byzantine Missions, which is currently being translated into English and Czech.

Anna Starobinets

Anna Starobinets is one of a handful of Russian authors who writes in the genre of 'intellectual fantasy'. She was born in Moscow in 1978 and graduated in philology at Moscow State University. As a student she worked part time in several different fields, from simultaneous translation and private tutoring, to billposting and waitressing. After her finishing her degree she started work in journalism.

BOOK EXPO AMERICA 2011

The first Russian stand at BookExpo America New York, 23 - 26 May 2011 This year the BOOKS FROM RUSSIA stand took part in BookExpo America, the main fair in the American book industry. The stand was organised by the Russian Federal agency for Press and Mass Communications and represented a range of Russian publishers. BookExpo America is currently undergoing major changes, transforming itself from a fair which focused primarily on the domestic market into an international book forum.

Anthony Briggs

Professor Tony Briggs, Senior Research Fellow at Bristol University, has written, translated or edited more than twenty books on Russian and English literature. After gaining a reputation as a leading authority on Alexander Pushkin, he has turned to Tolstoy in recent years, writing for Penguin Books.

Mikhail Shishkin wins the Big Book Prize

Congratulations to Mikhail Shishkin for winning Big Book Prize and the readers' choice for his novel Pismovnik (Letter-Book).

A Prague Night by Pavel Pepperstein

On May 1, 200.., a certain individual arrived in Prague. I was that individual: Ilya Korolenko, attractively clean-featured and inconspicuous, with a dreamy look in my eyes and hair spiralling into a passionate, babyish twist over my forehead. In terms of intimate predilection, in terms of my mission, I am a poet, sometimes I put a few words together and revel in their magic, their incongruous voodoo

Matisse by Alexander Ilichevsky

Living as a tramp was hard, but fascinating. He kept trying to find a new angle on things, an interesting way to get his teeth into Moscow, which he now saw as the same kind of special setting for thrills and action as his childhood – a kingdom of scrap yards and rubbish dumps, basements

A Light Head by Olga Slavnikova

Maxim T. Yermakov, the happy owner of a three-year-old Toyota and brand manager for several appalling varieties of milk chocolate, drove up to his chocolate office with his customary feeling of having no head on his shoulders. Meanwhile, the head was smoking and it could see the wet car park with the inflatable snowman standing in the black January puddle. But even so – it wasn’t there.

Sin – A Novel in Short Stories

He was seventeen years old, and he held his body nervously. His body was made up of an Adam’s apple, strong bones, long arms, absent-minded eyes, and an overheated brain. In the evenings, when he lay down to sleep in his hut, he used to turn over the phrase ‘and he’s dead… he’s dead’ in his head, listening to it.

The City Rate by Alexandra Marinina

Hopelessly stuck in the traffic, Nastya cursed the laziness that had made her accept the offer of an official car from her new boss, Bolshakov. It would have been so much quicker by metro. Of course, if only she’d bothered to think for just a moment, she wouldn’t have taken the car, but everything happened so fast, she was caught on the hop.

Stalin's Foreign Policy by Ernst Henry

In December 1952, three months before Stalin’s death, the French Communist Party abruptly expelled two of the most distinguished members of its Politburo, André Marty and Charles Tillon. These were exalted veterans of the revolutionary movement in France, having risen to prominence as far back as the 1920s. Both belonged to the party’s founding core but had enjoyed Lenin’s trust even during the Russian Civil War.

Sergei Kostin's Farewell - Amazon bestseller

The English translation of Farewell: The Greatest Spy Story of the Twentieth Century, by acclaimed Russian author Sergei Kostin and Eric Raynaud, has become one of the best selling books on Amazon.

Boris Pasternak by Dmitry Bykov

‘Life has been good’ were his words during one of the many illnesses that preceded his death, when he was bedridden in Peredelkino and could no longer expect help from any quarter: the ambulance service would not travel outside Moscow and the government and writers’ hospitals would no longer admit him. ‘I’ve done everything I wanted to do.’ ‘If this is dying, then it is nothing to be scared of,’ he said three days before he died, after the latest blood transfusion had briefly renewed his strength.

Pet Monkey of the House of Tang by Master Chen

The Book of Necromancers The hero is caught in a fog, in the midst of a dreadful and a wondrous story, groping to find his way. He is surrounded by enigmas at every turn and can’t begin to fathom the direction from which deadly arrows are flying. Lo! He hears the heavy, cruel word war, which cuts through the fog like an icy wind and begins to disperse it.

The Devil's Wheel by Mikhail Gigolashvili

Screw-ups and setups were commonplace in Koka’s life. He decided to put the matter on the back burner, telling himself, enough is enough! I’m going to Paris to escape from this savage barbarism. He was sitting in front of the TV, bored, when his neighbor Nukri, an avid reader of porn magazines, dropped by with a bit of weed from Asia. He promised to find out where he could get more and how much it would be.

The Fount of Happiness by Polina Dashkova

“Clearly before he died the old man had been seeking the philosopher’s stone… the rogue! And he had managed to keep it a secret!” V.F. Odoevsky, “The Sylph” Chapter One: Moscow 1916 Professor Mikhail Vladimirovich Sveshnikov’s apartment occupied the fourth floor in a new building on Second Tverskaya-Yamskaya Street. The professor was a widower, although he was not old, and he had three children – malicious gossips claimed he had grown them all in test-tubes.

Soloviev and Larionov

He was born at a halt with the unexceptional name of Kilometre 715. For all its three digits, the halt was extremely small with neither a cinema, a post office, nor even a school. It consisted of six wooden huts strung along the railway track. On reaching the age of 16, he left, went to St Petersburg, entered the University, and began the study of history.

The List by Dmitry Bykov

At Vnukovo, the scriptwriter Sergei Spiridov, who was flying to the Crimea for a children’s film festival with the picture The Little Miracle, was detained at the border. Spiridov said hello to the genial blonde border official, proffered his overseas passport to her (he could have gone on his internal one, but Sviridov liked to think he was showing work abroad) and prepared to wait. The procedure usually took no more than a minute.

The Living One by Anna Starobinets

Greetings from “Renaissance” the Universal Historical Data Bank Attention! This unit contains only private letters and documents. This unit has been leased for 120 years with the option of subsequent extension. Access to this cell is limited exclusively to the leaseholder. Access to this cell is not available to the leaseholder if he has not yet reached the age of eight.
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